lemonlove:

dstroym:

And now, here is a clam eating some salt.

(by 100critical)

Well, this is probably the strangest thing I’ve watched in a few days.

Reblogged from lemonlove 1 year ago

7 notes

blackspaceandstars:

arrow-and-oracle:

fantastical

is it love?

This awesome replica of a turrilitid ammonite is from the Cretaceous Seas diorama at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. I don’t know exactly which type of turrilitid this is, but my best guess is the genus Pseudhelicoceras.
Members of the ammonite family Turrilitidae are characterized by shells that are not typical tight spirals—a condition known to paleontologists as heteromorph. It isn’t clear what ecological niche the turrilitids filled, but at least some species are thought to have drifted up and down in the water column. They lived world-wide during the late Cretaceous period, but, like all ammonites, they went extinct in the same global catastrophe that killed off the dinosaurs 65 million years ago.
http://www.indiesquidkid.com/2009/10/23/flickr-friday-they-dont-make-em-like-this-any-more/

blackspaceandstars:

arrow-and-oracle:

fantastical

is it love?

This awesome replica of a turrilitid ammonite is from the Cretaceous Seas diorama at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City. I don’t know exactly which type of turrilitid this is, but my best guess is the genus Pseudhelicoceras.

Members of the ammonite family Turrilitidae are characterized by shells that are not typical tight spirals—a condition known to paleontologists as heteromorph. It isn’t clear what ecological niche the turrilitids filled, but at least some species are thought to have drifted up and down in the water column. They lived world-wide during the late Cretaceous period, but, like all ammonites, they went extinct in the same global catastrophe that killed off the dinosaurs 65 million years ago.

http://www.indiesquidkid.com/2009/10/23/flickr-friday-they-dont-make-em-like-this-any-more/

(Source: tampaxsuperstar)

Reblogged from reqbat-deactivated20130323 2 years ago

3,838 notes

allcreatures:


Temperate Waters, runner-up: Siphonophore (Physophora hydrostatica) by Jorn Ari, Denmark

Picture: Jorn Ari (via Underwater photography competition medal winners 2011/12 - Telegraph)

allcreatures:

Temperate Waters, runner-up: Siphonophore (Physophora hydrostatica) by Jorn Ari, Denmark

Picture: Jorn Ari (via Underwater photography competition medal winners 2011/12 - Telegraph)

Reblogged from allcreatures 2 years ago

189 notes

fuckyeahoceancreatures:

Starfish feeding on a dead whale.

(Source: nervation)

Reblogged from fuckyeahoceancreatures 2 years ago

361,162 notes

in-the-deep:

Chambered Nautilus
The Chambered Nautilus is the most well known nautilus, and unlike most cephalopods, its ~90 tentacles have no ‘suckers’. It’s shell, which exhibits countershading to protect from predators, displays a nearly perfect logarithmic spiral on its interior, and is lined with mother of pearl (nacre). They have a pair of rhinophores which use olfaction and chemotaxis in order to find their food. To swim, the nautilus draws water into and out of the living chamber with its hyponome (siphon), which uses jet prepulsion. While water is inside the chamber, the siphuncle extracts salt from it and diffuses it into the blood. The animal adjusts its buoyancy by osmotically pumping gas and fluid into or out of the camerae along the siphuncles. This limits them; they cannot operate under the extreme hydrostatic pressures found at depths greater than approximately 800 metres (2,600 ft). In the wild, nautiluses usually inhabit depths of about 300 metres (980 ft), rising to around 100 metres (330 ft) at night to feed, mate and to lay eggs.

in-the-deep:

Chambered Nautilus

The Chambered Nautilus is the most well known nautilus, and unlike most cephalopods, its ~90 tentacles have no ‘suckers’. It’s shell, which exhibits countershading to protect from predators, displays a nearly perfect logarithmic spiral on its interior, and is lined with mother of pearl (nacre). They have a pair of rhinophores which use olfaction and chemotaxis in order to find their food.
To swim, the nautilus draws water into and out of the living chamber with its hyponome (siphon), which uses jet prepulsion. While water is inside the chamber, the siphuncle extracts salt from it and diffuses it into the blood. The animal adjusts its buoyancy by osmotically pumping gas and fluid into or out of the camerae along the siphuncles. This limits them; they cannot operate under the extreme hydrostatic pressures found at depths greater than approximately 800 metres (2,600 ft). In the wild, nautiluses usually inhabit depths of about 300 metres (980 ft), rising to around 100 metres (330 ft) at night to feed, mate and to lay eggs.

Reblogged from nemosfin 2 years ago

19 notes

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